Southwestern style in decor

Posted on Categories:Berho Bros, LLC, dba Los Andes Shop, Blog, Information Section

Our native print blankets work great in Southwestern style decor.

What are key elements of Southwestern decor style? 

  • Warm colors that reflect the sky and earth, such as terracotta and turquoise, although modern Southwestern decor often prefers the more subdued palette of natural grays, browns, and whites. 

  • Simple wood furniture, often with iron accents. 

  • Leather upholstery.

  • Woven textiles in geometric patterns inspired by Native Americans master weavers.

  • Pottery in earth tones.

How is it possible that blankets made in Ecuador work so well in a decor style representing the southwestern United States?

Ecuador and much of the United States Southwest were both colonized by the Spaniards in the 16th century.  Because one country, government and church ruled over a vast area, there are many commonalities across the whole former Spanish empire, including language, city layout, and construction styles. 

For example, from Santa Fe, New Mexico to Santiago, Chile, the principal town plaza has a cathedral along one side, and a government building called the cabildo along another.  Streets are laid out in a grid, and the closer the building to the main plaza, the greater importance it had socially and economically.

Like the U.S. Southwest, there were many native groups in what is now Ecuador. The people who make our blankets, called Otavaleños, had been infringed on by the larger, more powerful Incas just prior to the arrival of the Spaniards, who forced them to create woolen and cotton cloth that was sent throughout much of South America.

When the Otavaleños gained their freedom, they continued using these skills and created their own designs.  Many have geometric patterns and incorporate native symbols.  While not exactly the same as the famous Navajo designs, there are many similarities, especially to the casual observer.

To learn more about Southwestern interior decor, check out these pages:

A Beautiful Mess

The Spruce

To learn more about the native crafters that make our products, click here.